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Michael Novakhov retweeted: Incredible: Alexei @navalny said that the judge, who replaced his suspended sentence with a real one, handed him a letter “with regrets about her decision. ● Judge Natalia Repnikova gave him the letter through her lawyers. She regretted her decision and called him “a brave man”

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

Incredible: Alexei @navalny said that the judge, who replaced his suspended sentence with a real one, handed him a letter “with regrets about her decision.

● Judge Natalia Repnikova gave him the letter through her lawyers. She regretted her decision and called him “a brave man”

FTgrBm5WYAABhuD.jpg:large

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Robb Elementary Uvalde – Google Search google.com/search?q=Robb+…

Robb Elementary Uvalde – Google Search google.com/search?q=Robb+…
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14 students, 1 teacher killed in Texas elementary school shooting, Gov. Greg Abbott says. The shooter is also dead, Abbott says. usatoday.com/story/news/nat… via @usatoday

14 students, 1 teacher killed in Texas elementary school shooting, Gov. Greg Abbott says. The shooter is also dead, Abbott says. usatoday.com/story/news/nat… via @usatoday
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Stocks tumble on growth concerns, bond yields slip

2022-05-24T21:02:49Z

Shares slid worldwide on Tuesday as supply chain woes and surging costs hurt corporate earnings and manufacturing output slowed, while Treasury yields dipped as the weakness in equities revived a safe-haven bid for U.S. government debt.

The stock market’s two-day relief rally ended as investors worried about slowing economies. Corporate profit margins have been squeezed, with soaring inflation forcing consumers to cut discretionary spending.

U.S. and euro zone business activity slowed in May. S&P Global attributed the decline in its U.S. Composite PMI Output to “elevated inflationary pressures, a further deterioration in supplier delivery times and weaker demand growth.”

Surging freight and raw material prices led Abercrombie & Fitch Co (ANF.N) to say it will face headwinds until at least year-end, a day after Snapchat parent Snap Inc (SNAP.N) said the U.S. economy worsened faster than expected in April. read more

The economy likely will slump as the Federal Reserve hikes interest rates to stamp out inflation, said David Petrosinelli, senior trader at InspereX.

“It’s really all about a hard landing and the Fed really being boxed in the corner with only demand-side tools to help,” he said. “They really need to squash demand.”

MSCI’s gauge of stocks across the globe (.MIWD00000PUS) closed down 0.91%. The pan-European STOXX 600 index (.STOXX) fell 1.14%.

On Wall Street, the Nasdaq Composite (.IXIC) dropped 2.35% and the S&P 500 (.SPX) lost 0.81% as investors turned to defensive positions. But shares pares losses late and the Dow Jones Industrial Average (.DJI) managed to close up 0.15%.

Value shares rose 0.17%, while growth shares (.IGX) fell 1.90%.

Shares of Snap plummeted 43.1%, dragging down several social media and internet stocks. Abercrombie fell 28.6%.

In Europe, all major sectors posted broad declines, with luxury stocks and retailers taking the lead.

European Central Bank Chief Christine Lagarde said she saw the ECB’s deposit rate at zero or “slightly above” by the end of September, implying an increase of at least 50 basis points from its current level as the bank fights inflation.

“It has raised jitters in global markets about the possibility at least of a more aggressive move by the ECB,” said Phil Shaw, chief economist at Investec in London.

“There were reports overnight that some hawks on the governing council thought her comments yesterday seemed to rule out a 50-basis-point hike, but her remarks today appeared to leave that on the table,” he said.

Germany’s 10-year Bund yield fell 9 basis points to 0.959% , and Treasury yields skidded to one-month lows as those on benchmark 10-year Treasury notes > slid 9.8 basis points to 2.761%.

The U.S. dollar index hit nearly a one-month low after Lagarde comments gave the euro a boost.

The dollar index fell 0.362%, with the euro up 0.39% to $1.0731.

Lagarde’s remarks should pressure the U.S. dollar in the short-term after its recent rally to the highest level in two decades, said Bipan Rai, North America head of FX Strategy at CIBC Capital Markets.

But “the broader macro backdrop still supports the risk-off take,” Rai said. “The dollar still has more room to run over the medium term.”

Markets took some comfort from U.S. President Joe Biden’s comment on Monday that he was considering easing tariffs on China, and from Beijing’s continuing promises of stimulus. read more

Yet China’s zero-COVID-19 policy and its lockdowns have already done considerable economic damage.

JPMorgan cut its forecast for second-quarter Chinese gross domestic product to a 5.4% contraction from a prior forecast for a 1.5% decline after disappointing data in April. On an annualized basis, its global forecast for the quarter is 0.6%, the weakest since the global financial crisis outside of 2020.

Oil prices traded little changed as tight supply worries offset concerns over a possible recession and China’s COVID-19 curbs.

U.S. crude futures settled down 52 cents at $109.77 a barrel, and Brent rose 14 cents to settle at $113.56.

Gold prices rose to their highest in two weeks as the safe-haven metal’s appeal was lifted by a weaker U.S. dollar and lower Treasury yields.

U.S. gold futures settled up nearly 1% at $1,865.40 an ounce.

Bitcoin last rose 0.99% to $29,371.04.

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The German share price index DAX graph is pictured at the stock exchange in Frankfurt, Germany, April 26, 2022. REUTERS/Staff

Men wearing protective face masks walk under an electronic board showing Japan’s Nikkei share average inside a conference hall, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, in Tokyo, Japan January 25, 2022. REUTERS/Issei Kato
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Texas Governor says 15 killed in elementary school shooting

2022-05-24T21:08:45Z

A gunman opened fire at an elementary school in South Texas on Tuesday, killing 14 students and one teacher, Governor Greg Abbott told reporters.

Abbott said the suspect, who the governor identified as 18-year-old Salvador Ramos, was himself killed, apparently by police officers responding to the scene.

Official details on the circumstances of the midday shooting remained sketchy in the immediate aftermath of the violence, which unfolded at Robb Elementary School in the town of Uvalde, Texas, about 80 miles west of San Antonio.

“He shot and killed horrifically, incomprehensibly, 14 students and killed a teacher. Mr. Ramos, the shooter, he himself is deceased and its believed that responding officers killed him,” Abbott told a news briefing.

Related Galleries:

A school employee talks through the window of a school bus to one of the parents near the scene of a suspected shooting near Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 24, 2022. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Law enforcement personnel run away from the scene of a suspected shooting near Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 24, 2022. REUTERS/Marco Bello

A woman reacts while talking on the phone outside the Ssgt Willie de Leon Civic Center, where students had been transported from Robb Elementary School to be picked up after a suspected shooting, in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 24, 2022. REUTERS/Marco Bello

A board with the list of classes/teachers is displayed outside the Ssgt Willie de Leon Civic Center, where students had been transported from Robb Elementary School to be picked up after a suspected shooting, in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 24, 2022. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Law enforcement personnel guard the scene of a suspected shooting near Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 24, 2022. REUTERS/Marco Bello
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Moscow insiders ‘discuss Vladimir Putin successor’ as unease over Ukraine war grows – The Telegraph

Moscow insiders ‘discuss Vladimir Putin successor’ as unease over Ukraine war grows  The Telegraph
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Hungary Imposes State Of Emergency Over Russia-Ukraine War – NDTV

Hungary Imposes State Of Emergency Over Russia-Ukraine War  NDTV
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At least 14 students and one teacher were killed when a gunman opened fire at an elementary school in Texas, Governor Greg Abbott said Tuesday. Abbott said the shooter is also dead, and is believed to have been killed by responding law enforcement officers. Abbott’s comments came after the district reported an active shooter at Robb Elementary in Uvalde, Texas, which is approximately an hour and a half west of San Antonio. Abbott said the shooter was an 18-year-old male who resided in Uvalde. He said it’s believed the suspect, who he named as Salvador Ramos, abandoned his vehicle, then entered the school with a handgun and possibly a rifle. “He shot and killed — horrifically, incomprehensibly — 14 students and killed a teacher,” Abbott said. Texas School-Shooting Emergency personnel gather near Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas. DARIO LOPEZ-MILLS / AP The Uvalde Memorial Hospital previously said it received 13 children from ambulance and buses for treatment, and that two people who arrived at the hospital were deceased. A second hospital said it is caring for one child and one adult. That hospital, University Health, said a 66-year-old woman and a 10-year-old girl are in critical condition. South Texas Blood and Tissue said it sent 15 units of blood to Uvalde on Tuesday. Though the details of the shooting are unclear, the district said that there had been an “active shooter” at Robb Elementary in Uvalde, Texas. The Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District — located about an hour and a half west of San Antonio — tweeted that there is “an active shooter at Robb Elementary,” adding, “Law enforcement is on site. Your cooperation is needed at this time by not visiting the campus. As soon as more information is gathered it will be shared.” At approximately 2:00 p.m. local time, the district said parents were cleared to pick up their children at the local civic center. New Updates 2M AGO 14 students, 1 teacher dead, governor says Texas Governor Greg Abbott said 14 students and one teacher were killed in the shooting. Abbott described the suspect as an 18-year-old male from Uvalde, who he said is believed to have entered the school with a handgun and possibly a rifle. “He shot and killed — horrifically, incomprehensibly — 14 students and killed a teacher,” Abbott said.Governor Greg Abbott said the shooter is also dead, and is believed to have been killed by responding law enforcement officers.

At least 14 students and one teacher were killed when a gunman opened fire at an elementary school in Texas, Governor Greg Abbott said Tuesday. Abbott said the shooter is also dead, and is believed to have been killed by responding law enforcement officers.

Abbott’s comments came after the district reported an active shooter at Robb Elementary in Uvalde, Texas, which is approximately an hour and a half west of San Antonio.

Abbott said the shooter was an 18-year-old male who resided in Uvalde. He said it’s believed the suspect, who he named as Salvador Ramos, abandoned his vehicle, then entered the school with a handgun and possibly a rifle.

“He shot and killed — horrifically, incomprehensibly — 14 students and killed a teacher,” Abbott said.

Texas School-Shooting

Emergency personnel gather near Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.

DARIO LOPEZ-MILLS / AP

The Uvalde Memorial Hospital previously said it received 13 children from ambulance and buses for treatment, and that two people who arrived at the hospital were deceased. A second hospital said it is caring for one child and one adult. That hospital, University Health, said a 66-year-old woman and a 10-year-old girl are in critical condition.

South Texas Blood and Tissue said it sent 15 units of blood to Uvalde on Tuesday.

Though the details of the shooting are unclear, the district said that there had been an “active shooter” at Robb Elementary in Uvalde, Texas.

The Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District — located about an hour and a half west of San Antonio — tweeted that there is “an active shooter at Robb Elementary,” adding, “Law enforcement is on site. Your cooperation is needed at this time by not visiting the campus. As soon as more information is gathered it will be shared.”

At approximately 2:00 p.m. local time, the district said parents were cleared to pick up their children at the local civic center.

New Updates

2M AGO

14 students, 1 teacher dead, governor says

Texas Governor Greg Abbott said 14 students and one teacher were killed in the shooting. Abbott described the suspect as an 18-year-old male from Uvalde, who he said is believed to have entered the school with a handgun and possibly a rifle.

“He shot and killed — horrifically, incomprehensibly — 14 students and killed a teacher,” Abbott said.

Governor Greg Abbott said the shooter is also dead, and is believed to have been killed by responding law enforcement officers.

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‘Created to scare the population’: How one Russian brigade terrorised Bucha War crime investigators believe one unit was responsible for many atrocities in Kyiv suburb 21 minutes ago Updated: 18 minutes ago Carlotta Gall Investigators and cemetery workers exhume the burned remains of a family, in Bucha, Ukraine. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times Investigators and cemetery workers exhume the burned remains of a family, in Bucha, Ukraine. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times When the soldiers of Russia’s 64th Motor Rifle Brigade arrived in Bucha in mid-March, they brought a new level of death and terror to the city. Over the next 18 days, in just one corner of this Kyiv suburb where the brigade took control, 12 people were killed, including all of the inhabitants of six houses where the soldiers set up camp. Olha Havryliuk’s son and son-in-law, along with a stranger, were shot in the head in the yard of their house. Russian soldiers smashed the Havryliuks’ fence, parked their armoured vehicle in the garden and moved into the house. They cooked in the neighbour’s garden, killing and plucking chickens and roasting them on a barbecue while the men lay dead yards away across the alley. By the time the troops pulled out at the end of March, two brothers, Yuriy and Viktor Pavlenko, who lived at the end of the street, lay dead in a ditch by the railway line. Volodymyr Cherednychenko was found dead in a neighbour’s cellar. Another man, caught by Russian soldiers as he ran along the train track and taken into a cellar of a house at the end of the street, was also found shot dead. Olha Havryliuk with her daughter, Iryna Duhliy, in front of her home on May 8th, where her son and son-in-law, were found shot dead in the yard, along with a stranger, in Bucha. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times Olha Havryliuk with her daughter, Iryna Duhliy, in front of her home on May 8th, where her son and son-in-law, were found shot dead in the yard, along with a stranger, in Bucha. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times The story of Bucha and its horrors has unfolded in chapters as new revelations of Russian atrocities emerge, fuelling outrage among Ukrainians and across much of the world. But prosecutors and military intelligence officials were investigating early on, collecting evidence to try to identify the perpetrators responsible for the mass killings, torture and rapes in the once tranquil suburb. Working with war crimes and forensic experts from around the world, Ukrainian investigators have reached some preliminary conclusions, focusing in particular on the 64th Brigade. They have already identified 10 soldiers from the unit and accused them of war crimes. Ukrainian officials say that the brigade was formed after Russia struggled in a 2008 war with Georgia, and that it was awarded an honorary title by Russian president Vladimir Putin last month for its performance in Ukraine. Yet the brigade took little part in any fighting, coming in after other units had seized control of Bucha and then tasked with “holding” it. The troops established checkpoints throughout the town, parking their armoured vehicles in people’s yards and taking over their homes. “They imprisoned our people,” said Ruslan Kravchenko, the chief prosecutor for the Bucha district, describing the actions of the accused soldiers. “They tied their hands and legs and taped their eyes. They beat them with fists and feet, and with gun butts in the chest, and imitated executions.” The prosecutor Ruslan Kravchenko (left) leads a search of a Russian base, in Bucha, Ukraine. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times The prosecutor Ruslan Kravchenko (left) leads a search of a Russian base, in Bucha, Ukraine. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times The name of the 64th Brigade and a list of 1,600 of its soldiers were found among computer files left behind in the Russian military headquarters in Bucha, providing investigators with an immense resource as they began their investigation. Dmytro Replianchuk at Slidtsvo.info, a Ukrainian investigative news agency, soon found the social media profiles of dozens of the names, including officers. Three victims who survived beatings and torture have been able to identify the perpetrators from the photographs, Kravchenko said. One of the victims was Yuriy (50) a factory worker, who lives near one of the most notorious Russian bases, at 144 Yablunska Street. On March 13th, a unit of the 64th Brigade came to search his house. He said that he had identified the soldiers when shown photographs by prosecutors. The soldiers were rough and uncouth, he said. “You could see they were from the Taiga,” he said, referring to the Siberian forest. “They just talk to bears.” Yuriy managed to avoid suspicion, but on March 19th, the soldiers returned and detained his neighbour Oleksiy. Like several others interviewed for this article, the men asked to be identified by only their first names for their security. Oleksiy declined to be interviewed but confirmed that he had been detained twice by the Russian unit, interrogated in a basement for several hours and put through a mock execution when the soldiers fired a gun behind him. Still shaken, he said, “I just want to try to forget it all.” Europe and Russia, 2022: A fast-changing continent in five graphics Volodymyr Zelensky calls for maximum sanctions against Russia Russian soldier sentenced to life in prison for killing unarmed civilian in Ukraine Based in Russia’s far east, near the border with China, the 64th Brigade belongs to the Eastern Military District, long seen as the part of the Russian army with the lowest levels of training and equipment. The brigade has ethnic Russian commanders but consists largely of soldiers drawn from minority ethnic groups and disadvantaged communities, according to Col Mykola Krasny, the head of public affairs of Ukrainian military intelligence. In radio conversations that were intercepted by Ukrainian forces, some of the Russians expressed surprise that village roads in outlying areas of Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital, were paved with asphalt, he said. “We see it as a deliberate policy to draft soldiers from depressed regions of Russia,” Krasny said. Not a lot is known about the brigade, but Krasny claimed that it was notable for its lack of morality, for beatings of soldiers and for thieving. Drawn from a regiment that had served in Chechnya, the brigade was established January 1st, 2009, shortly after Russia’s war in Georgia, Krasny said. The goal was clear, he added: to build up a fearsome army unit that could instil control. “The consequences of these politics was what happened in Bucha,” he said. “Having no discipline, and these aggressive habits, it looks like it was created to scare the population.” The Russian government did not respond to a request for comment on the accusations against the 64th Brigade but has repeatedly claimed that allegations of its forces having committed atrocities in Bucha and elsewhere are false. Killings occurred in Bucha from the first days that Russian troops appeared. The first units were airborne assault troops, paratroopers and special forces who fired on cars and civilians in the streets and detained men suspected of being in the Ukrainian army or territorial defence. The extent of the killings, and the seeming lack of hesitation among Russian soldiers to carry them out, has led Ukrainian officials to surmise that they were acting under orders. “They couldn’t not know,” Kravchenko said of senior military commanders. “I think the terror was planned.” Many of the documented killings occurred on Yablunska Street, where bodies lay for weeks, visible on satellite images. But not far away, on a corner of Ivana Franka Street, a particular form of hell played out after March 12th. The entrance to 144 Yablunska Street, a notorious Russian base where eight people were executed, in Bucha. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times The entrance to 144 Yablunska Street, a notorious Russian base where eight people were executed, in Bucha. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times Residents had already been warned that things would get worse. A pensioner, Mykola (67) said that Russian troops who first came to the neighbourhood had advised him to leave while he could. “’After us, such bad guys will come,’” the commander told him, he recalled. “I think they had radio contact and they knew who was coming, and they had their own opinion of them.” Mykola left Bucha before the 64th Brigade arrived. The spring flowers are pushing up everywhere in Bucha, fruit trees are in blossom, and city workers have swept the streets and filled in some of the bomb craters. But at the end of Ivana Franka Street, amid smashed cars and destroyed homes, there is an eerie desolation. “From this house to the end, no one is left alive,” said Havryliuk (65). “Eleven people were killed here. Only we stayed alive.” Her son and son-in-law had stayed behind to look after the house and the dogs, and were killed March 12th or 13th, when the 64th Brigade first arrived, she said. The death certificates said that they had been shot in the head. What happened over the next two weeks is hard to fathom. The few residents who stayed were confined to their homes and only occasionally dared to go out to fetch water from a well. Some of them saw people being detained by the Russians. Nadezhda Cherednychenko (50) pleaded with the soldiers to let her son go. He was being held in the yard of a house and his arm had been injured when she last saw him. She found him dead in the cellar of the same house three weeks later, after the Russians withdrew. “They should be punished,” she said of his captors. “They brought so much pain to people. Mothers without children, fathers, children without parents. It’s something you cannot forgive.” Neighbours who lived next door to the Havryliuks just disappeared. Volodymyr and Tetiana Shypilo, a teacher, and their son Andriy (39) lived in one part of the house, and Oleh Yarmolenko (47) lived alone in the other side. “They were all our relatives,” Havryliuk said. Tetiana Naumova and her husband, Vitaliy, with photographs of her parents, Lidiya and Serhiy Sydorenko, who were killed by Russian troops, in Bucha, Ukraine. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times Tetiana Naumova and her husband, Vitaliy, with photographs of her parents, Lidiya and Serhiy Sydorenko, who were killed by Russian troops, in Bucha, Ukraine. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times Down a side alley lived Lidiya Sydorenko (62) and her husband Serhiy (65). Their daughter, Tetiana Naumova, said that she spoke to them by telephone mid-morning on March 22nd. “Mother was crying the whole time,” Naumova said. “She was usually an optimist, but I think she had a bad feeling.” Minutes later, Russian soldiers came in and demanded to search their garage. They told a neighbour to leave, shooting at the ground by her feet. “By lunchtime they had killed them,” Naumova said. She returned to the house with her husband, Vitaliy, and her son Anton last month after Russian troops withdrew from Kyiv. Her parents were nowhere to be found, but they found ominous traces – her father’s hat with bullet holes in it, three pools of blood and a piece of her mother’s scalp and hair. There was also no sign of the Shypilos or of Yarmolenko, except trails of blood where bodies had been dragged along the floor of their house. Eventually, French forensic investigators solved the mystery. They examined six charred bodies found in an empty lot up the street and confirmed that they were the missing civilians: the Sydorenkos, the three Shypilos and Yarmolenko. Several bore bullet wounds but three of them had had limbs severed, including Naumova’s mother, the investigators told the families. Her father had multiple gunshot wounds to the head and chest, her mother had had an arm and a leg cut off, she said. “They tortured them,” Havryliuk said, “and burned them to cover their tracks.” This article originally appeared in The New York Times. ‘Created to scare the population’: How one Russian brigade terrorised Buchawww.irishtimes.comWar crime investigators believe one unit was responsible for many atrocities in Kyiv suburb

‘Created to scare the population’: How one Russian brigade terrorised Bucha

War crime investigators believe one unit was responsible for many atrocities in Kyiv suburb

21 minutes ago Updated: 18 minutes ago

Carlotta Gall

Investigators and cemetery workers exhume the burned remains of a family, in Bucha, Ukraine. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times

Investigators and cemetery workers exhume the burned remains of a family, in Bucha, Ukraine. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times


When the soldiers of Russia’s 64th Motor Rifle Brigade arrived in Bucha in mid-March, they brought a new level of death and terror to the city. Over the next 18 days, in just one corner of this Kyiv suburb where the brigade took control, 12 people were killed, including all of the inhabitants of six houses where the soldiers set up camp. Olha Havryliuk’s son and son-in-law, along with a stranger, were shot in the head in the yard of their house. Russian soldiers smashed the Havryliuks’ fence, parked their armoured vehicle in the garden and moved into the house. They cooked in the neighbour’s garden, killing and plucking chickens and roasting them on a barbecue while the men lay dead yards away across the alley.

By the time the troops pulled out at the end of March, two brothers, Yuriy and Viktor Pavlenko, who lived at the end of the street, lay dead in a ditch by the railway line. Volodymyr Cherednychenko was found dead in a neighbour’s cellar. Another man, caught by Russian soldiers as he ran along the train track and taken into a cellar of a house at the end of the street, was also found shot dead.

Olha Havryliuk with her daughter, Iryna Duhliy, in front of her home on May 8th, where her son and son-in-law, were found shot dead in the yard, along with a stranger, in Bucha. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times

Olha Havryliuk with her daughter, Iryna Duhliy, in front of her home on May 8th, where her son and son-in-law, were found shot dead in the yard, along with a stranger, in Bucha. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times

The story of Bucha and its horrors has unfolded in chapters as new revelations of Russian atrocities emerge, fuelling outrage among Ukrainians and across much of the world. But prosecutors and military intelligence officials were investigating early on, collecting evidence to try to identify the perpetrators responsible for the mass killings, torture and rapes in the once tranquil suburb.

Working with war crimes and forensic experts from around the world, Ukrainian investigators have reached some preliminary conclusions, focusing in particular on the 64th Brigade. They have already identified 10 soldiers from the unit and accused them of war crimes.

Ukrainian officials say that the brigade was formed after Russia struggled in a 2008 war with Georgia, and that it was awarded an honorary title by Russian president Vladimir Putin last month for its performance in Ukraine. Yet the brigade took little part in any fighting, coming in after other units had seized control of Bucha and then tasked with “holding” it. The troops established checkpoints throughout the town, parking their armoured vehicles in people’s yards and taking over their homes.

“They imprisoned our people,” said Ruslan Kravchenko, the chief prosecutor for the Bucha district, describing the actions of the accused soldiers. “They tied their hands and legs and taped their eyes. They beat them with fists and feet, and with gun butts in the chest, and imitated executions.”

The prosecutor Ruslan Kravchenko (left) leads a search of a Russian base, in Bucha, Ukraine. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times

The prosecutor Ruslan Kravchenko (left) leads a search of a Russian base, in Bucha, Ukraine. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times

The name of the 64th Brigade and a list of 1,600 of its soldiers were found among computer files left behind in the Russian military headquarters in Bucha, providing investigators with an immense resource as they began their investigation. Dmytro Replianchuk at Slidtsvo.info, a Ukrainian investigative news agency, soon found the social media profiles of dozens of the names, including officers.

Three victims who survived beatings and torture have been able to identify the perpetrators from the photographs, Kravchenko said. One of the victims was Yuriy (50) a factory worker, who lives near one of the most notorious Russian bases, at 144 Yablunska Street. On March 13th, a unit of the 64th Brigade came to search his house. He said that he had identified the soldiers when shown photographs by prosecutors. The soldiers were rough and uncouth, he said. “You could see they were from the Taiga,” he said, referring to the Siberian forest. “They just talk to bears.”

Yuriy managed to avoid suspicion, but on March 19th, the soldiers returned and detained his neighbour Oleksiy. Like several others interviewed for this article, the men asked to be identified by only their first names for their security. Oleksiy declined to be interviewed but confirmed that he had been detained twice by the Russian unit, interrogated in a basement for several hours and put through a mock execution when the soldiers fired a gun behind him. Still shaken, he said, “I just want to try to forget it all.”

Europe and Russia, 2022: A fast-changing continent in five graphics

Volodymyr Zelensky calls for maximum sanctions against Russia

Russian soldier sentenced to life in prison for killing unarmed civilian in Ukraine

Based in Russia’s far east, near the border with China, the 64th Brigade belongs to the Eastern Military District, long seen as the part of the Russian army with the lowest levels of training and equipment. The brigade has ethnic Russian commanders but consists largely of soldiers drawn from minority ethnic groups and disadvantaged communities, according to Col Mykola Krasny, the head of public affairs of Ukrainian military intelligence. In radio conversations that were intercepted by Ukrainian forces, some of the Russians expressed surprise that village roads in outlying areas of Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital, were paved with asphalt, he said. “We see it as a deliberate policy to draft soldiers from depressed regions of Russia,” Krasny said. Not a lot is known about the brigade, but Krasny claimed that it was notable for its lack of morality, for beatings of soldiers and for thieving. Drawn from a regiment that had served in Chechnya, the brigade was established January 1st, 2009, shortly after Russia’s war in Georgia, Krasny said. The goal was clear, he added: to build up a fearsome army unit that could instil control.

“The consequences of these politics was what happened in Bucha,” he said. “Having no discipline, and these aggressive habits, it looks like it was created to scare the population.”

The Russian government did not respond to a request for comment on the accusations against the 64th Brigade but has repeatedly claimed that allegations of its forces having committed atrocities in Bucha and elsewhere are false.

Killings occurred in Bucha from the first days that Russian troops appeared. The first units were airborne assault troops, paratroopers and special forces who fired on cars and civilians in the streets and detained men suspected of being in the Ukrainian army or territorial defence.

The extent of the killings, and the seeming lack of hesitation among Russian soldiers to carry them out, has led Ukrainian officials to surmise that they were acting under orders. “They couldn’t not know,” Kravchenko said of senior military commanders. “I think the terror was planned.” Many of the documented killings occurred on Yablunska Street, where bodies lay for weeks, visible on satellite images. But not far away, on a corner of Ivana Franka Street, a particular form of hell played out after March 12th.

The entrance to 144 Yablunska Street, a notorious Russian base where eight people were executed, in Bucha. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times

The entrance to 144 Yablunska Street, a notorious Russian base where eight people were executed, in Bucha. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times

Residents had already been warned that things would get worse. A pensioner, Mykola (67) said that Russian troops who first came to the neighbourhood had advised him to leave while he could. “’After us, such bad guys will come,’” the commander told him, he recalled. “I think they had radio contact and they knew who was coming, and they had their own opinion of them.”

Mykola left Bucha before the 64th Brigade arrived. The spring flowers are pushing up everywhere in Bucha, fruit trees are in blossom, and city workers have swept the streets and filled in some of the bomb craters. But at the end of Ivana Franka Street, amid smashed cars and destroyed homes, there is an eerie desolation.

“From this house to the end, no one is left alive,” said Havryliuk (65). “Eleven people were killed here. Only we stayed alive.” Her son and son-in-law had stayed behind to look after the house and the dogs, and were killed March 12th or 13th, when the 64th Brigade first arrived, she said. The death certificates said that they had been shot in the head. What happened over the next two weeks is hard to fathom. The few residents who stayed were confined to their homes and only occasionally dared to go out to fetch water from a well. Some of them saw people being detained by the Russians.

Nadezhda Cherednychenko (50) pleaded with the soldiers to let her son go. He was being held in the yard of a house and his arm had been injured when she last saw him. She found him dead in the cellar of the same house three weeks later, after the Russians withdrew.

“They should be punished,” she said of his captors. “They brought so much pain to people. Mothers without children, fathers, children without parents. It’s something you cannot forgive.”

Neighbours who lived next door to the Havryliuks just disappeared. Volodymyr and Tetiana Shypilo, a teacher, and their son Andriy (39) lived in one part of the house, and Oleh Yarmolenko (47) lived alone in the other side. “They were all our relatives,” Havryliuk said.

Tetiana Naumova and her husband, Vitaliy, with photographs of her parents, Lidiya and Serhiy Sydorenko, who were killed by Russian troops, in Bucha, Ukraine. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times

Tetiana Naumova and her husband, Vitaliy, with photographs of her parents, Lidiya and Serhiy Sydorenko, who were killed by Russian troops, in Bucha, Ukraine. Photograph: Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times

Down a side alley lived Lidiya Sydorenko (62) and her husband Serhiy (65). Their daughter, Tetiana Naumova, said that she spoke to them by telephone mid-morning on March 22nd. “Mother was crying the whole time,” Naumova said. “She was usually an optimist, but I think she had a bad feeling.” Minutes later, Russian soldiers came in and demanded to search their garage. They told a neighbour to leave, shooting at the ground by her feet. “By lunchtime they had killed them,” Naumova said.

She returned to the house with her husband, Vitaliy, and her son Anton last month after Russian troops withdrew from Kyiv. Her parents were nowhere to be found, but they found ominous traces – her father’s hat with bullet holes in it, three pools of blood and a piece of her mother’s scalp and hair.

There was also no sign of the Shypilos or of Yarmolenko, except trails of blood where bodies had been dragged along the floor of their house. Eventually, French forensic investigators solved the mystery. They examined six charred bodies found in an empty lot up the street and confirmed that they were the missing civilians: the Sydorenkos, the three Shypilos and Yarmolenko. Several bore bullet wounds but three of them had had limbs severed, including Naumova’s mother, the investigators told the families.

Her father had multiple gunshot wounds to the head and chest, her mother had had an arm and a leg cut off, she said. “They tortured them,” Havryliuk said, “and burned them to cover their tracks.”

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

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When Vladimir Putin announced Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the war seemed far away from Russian territory By AP Monday, May 23, 2022 1:10 When Vladimir Putin announced the invasion of Ukraine, war seemed far away from Russian territory. Yet within days the conflict came home – not with cruise missiles and mortars but in the form of unprecedented and unexpectedly extensive volleys of sanctions by Western governments and economic punishment by corporations. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. McDonald’s – whose opening in Russia in 1990 was a cultural phenomenon, a shiny modern convenience coming to a dreary country ground down by limited choices – pulled out of Russia entirely in response to its invasion of Ukraine. IKEA, the epitome of affordable modern comforts, suspended operations. Tens of thousands of once-secure jobs are now suddenly in question in a very short time. Major industrial players including oil giants BP and Shell and automaker Renault walked away, despite their huge investments in Russia. Shell has estimated it will lose about $5 billion by trying to unload its Russian assets. While the multinationals were leaving, thousands of Russians who had the economic means to do so were also fleeing, frightened by harsh new government moves connected to the war that they saw as a plunge into full totalitarianism. Some young men may have also fled in fear that the Kremlin would impose a mandatory draft to feed its war machine. But fleeing had become much harder than it once was – the European Union’s 27 nations, along with the United States and Canada had banned flights to and from Russia. The Estonian capital of Tallinn, once an easy long-weekend destination 90 minutes by air from Moscow, suddenly took at least 12 hours to reach on a route through Istanbul. Even vicarious travel via the Internet and social media has narrowed for Russians. Russia in March banned Facebook and Instagram – although that can be circumvented by using VPNs – and shut access to foreign media websites, including the BBC, the U.S. government-funded Voice of America and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and the German broadcaster Deutsche Welle. After Russian authorities passed a law calling for up to 15 years’ imprisonment for stories that include “fake news” about the war, many significant independent news media shut down or suspended operations. Those included the Ekho Moskvy radio station and Novaya Gazeta, the newspaper whose editor Dmitry Muratov shared the most recent Nobel Peace Prize. The psychological cost of the repressions, restrictions and shrinking opportunities could be high on ordinary Russians, although difficult to measure. Although some public opinion polls in Russia suggest support for the Ukraine war is strong, the results are likely skewed by respondents who stay silent, wary of expressing their genuine views. Andrei Kolesnikov of the Carnegie Moscow Center wrote in a commentary that Russian society right now is gripped by an “aggressive submission” and that the degradation of social ties could accelerate. “The discussion gets broader and broader. You can call your compatriot – a fellow citizen, but one who happens to have a different opinion – a “traitor” and consider them an inferior kind of person. You can, like the most senior state officials, speculate freely and quite calmly on the prospects of nuclear war. (That’s) something that was certainly never permitted in Soviet times during Pax Atomica, when the two sides understood that the ensuing damage was completely unthinkable,” he wrote. “Now that understanding is waning, and that is yet another sign of the anthropological disaster Russia is facing,” he said. The economic consequences have yet to fully play out. In the early days of the war, the Russian ruble lost half its value. But government efforts to shore it up have actually raised its value to higher than its level before the invasion. But in terms of economic activity, “that’s a completely different story,” said Chris Weafer, a veteran Russia economy analyst at Macro-Advisory. “We see deterioration in the economy now across a broad range of sectors. Companies are warning that they’re running out of inventories of spare parts. A lot of companies put their workers on part time work and others are warning to them they have to shut down entirely. So there’s a real fear that unemployment will rise during the summer months, that there will be a big drop in consumption and retail sales and investment,” he told The Associated Press. The comparatively strong ruble, however heartening it may seem, also poses problems for the national budget, Weafer said. “They receive their revenue effectively in its foreign currency from the exporters and their payments are in rubles. So the stronger the ruble, then it means the less money that they actually have to spend,” he said. “(That) also makes Russian exporters less competitive, because they’re more expensive on the world stage.” If the war drags on, more companies could exit Russia. Weafer suggested that those companies who have only suspended operations might resume them if a cease-fire and peace deal for Ukraine are reached, but he said the window for this could be closing. “If you walk around shopping malls in Moscow, you can see that many of the fashion stores, Western business groups, have simply pulled down the shutters. Their shelves are still full, the lights are still on. They’re simply just not open. So they haven’t pulled out yet. They’re waiting to see what happens next,” he explained. Those companies will soon be pressed to resolve the limbo that their Russian businesses are in, Weafer said. “We are now getting to the stage where companies are starting to run out of time, or maybe run out of patience,” he said. ___ Follow all AP stories on the war in Ukraine at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine. FILE – Few visitors walk inside the GUM department store in Moscow, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, March 4, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File) FILE – In this image made from video released by the Russian Presidential Press Service, Russian President Vladimir Putin addresses the nation in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022. When Vladimir Putin announced Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the war seemed far away from Russian territory. Three months after the invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from blows to their livelihoods and emotions. (Russian Presidential Press Service via AP, File) FILE – People walk past a McDonald’s restaurant in the main street in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, March 9, 2022. McDonald’s – whose opening in Russia in 1990 was a cultural phenomenon, a shiny modern convenience coming to a dreary country ground down by limited choices – pulled out of Russia entirely in response to its invasion of Ukraine. (AP Photo, File) FILE – People walk past a currency exchange office screen displaying the exchange rates of U.S. Dollar and Euro to Russian Rubles in Moscow’s downtown, Russia, Feb. 28, 2022. Ordinary Russians are facing the prospect of higher prices as Western sanctions over the invasion of Ukraine sent the ruble plummeting. That’s led uneasy people to line up at banks and ATMs on Monday in a country that has seen more than one currency disaster in the post-Soviet era. (AP Photo, File) FILE – A woman stands in a currency exchange office in St. Petersburg, Russia, Friday, Feb. 25, 2022. Russians flocked to banks and ATMs on Thursday and Friday shortly after Russia launched an attack on Ukraine and the West announced crippling sanctions. According to Russia’s Central Bank, on Thursday alone Russians have withdrawn 111 billion rubles (about $1.3 billion) in cash. (AP Photo, File) FILE – Nobel Peace Prize winner Dmitry Muratov from Russia poses for a photo as he works on his speech at his room in The Grand Hotel in Oslo, Norway Thursday, Dec. 9, 2021. After Russian authorities passed a law calling for up to 15 years’ imprisonment for stories that include “fake news” about the war, many significant independent news media shut down or suspended operations. Those included the Ekho Moskvy radio station and Novaya Gazeta, the newspaper whose editor Dmitry Muratov shared the most recent Nobel Peace Prize. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File) FILE – Aeroflot’s passengers planes are parked at Sheremetyevo airport, outside Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, March 1, 2022. Fleeing had become much harder than it once was – the European Union’s 27 nations, along with the United States and Canada had banned flights to and from Russia. (AP Photo, File) FILE – People stand in line to withdraw money from an ATM of Alfa Bank in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, Feb. 27, 2022. Russians flocked to banks and ATMs shortly after Russia launched an attack on Ukraine on Feb. 24 and the West announced crippling sanctions. (AP Photo, File) FILE – A man holds a poster with writing reading “No war” as people lay flowers near the site where Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov was gunned down, with the Kremlin Wall, left, the Spaskaya Tower, center, and St. Basil’s in the background, in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, Feb. 27, 2022. (AP Photo, File) FILE – People wait in a line to pay for her purchases at the IKEA store on the outskirts of Moscow, Russia, Thursday, March 3, 2022. IKEA, the epitome of affordable modern comforts, suspended operations. Tens of thousands of once-secure jobs are now suddenly in question in a very short time. (AP Photo, File) FILE – Mannequins are seen through a window of closed Gucci boutique inside the GUM department store in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, March 9, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File) FILE – An elderly couple walks in a main street in Moscow, Russia, Monday, March 14, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File) FILE – A pedestrian walks along a closed Cartier boutique in the center of Moscow, Russia, Monday, March 14, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File) FILE – Shipping containers from the Maersk company are seen among others at a transshipment terminal in St. Petersburg, Russia, Thursday, March 24, 2022. Danish shipping company Maersk has suspended bookings for shipping to and from Ukraine, Russia and Belarus until further notice. (AP Photo, File) FILE – People walk past closed Adidas, Reebok and other shops in a mall in St. Petersburg, Russia, Thursday, March 24, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File) FILE – A woman walks past a boutique in the GUM department store closed due to sanctions on Red Square in Moscow, Russia, Monday, March 28, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File) FILE – People walk past a pharmacy and a currency exchange on a main street in Moscow, Russia, Friday, April 1, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File) FILE – People walk past a currency exchange office screen displaying the exchange rates of U.S. Dollar and Euro to Russian Rubles in Moscow’s downtown, Russia, Tuesday, March 29, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File) FILE -Parishioners line up for Holy Communion after an Orthodox religion service celebrating the Palm Sunday in a church in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, April 17, 2022. The economic consequences have yet to fully play out. In the early days of the war, the Russian ruble lost half its value. But government efforts to shore it up have actually raised its value to higher than its level before the invasion. (AP Photo, File) You might also like After 3 months of war, life in Russia has profoundly changedwww.the-journal.comWhen Vladimir Putin announced the invasion of Ukraine, war seemed far away from Russian territory. Yet within days the conflict came home – not with cruise missiles and mortars but in the form of unpr…

When Vladimir Putin announced Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the war seemed far away from Russian territory

By AP

Monday, May 23, 2022 1:10

When Vladimir Putin announced the invasion of Ukraine, war seemed far away from Russian territory. Yet within days the conflict came home – not with cruise missiles and mortars but in the form of unprecedented and unexpectedly extensive volleys of sanctions by Western governments and economic punishment by corporations.

Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers.

McDonald’s – whose opening in Russia in 1990 was a cultural phenomenon, a shiny modern convenience coming to a dreary country ground down by limited choices – pulled out of Russia entirely in response to its invasion of Ukraine. IKEA, the epitome of affordable modern comforts, suspended operations. Tens of thousands of once-secure jobs are now suddenly in question in a very short time.

Major industrial players including oil giants BP and Shell and automaker Renault walked away, despite their huge investments in Russia. Shell has estimated it will lose about $5 billion by trying to unload its Russian assets.

While the multinationals were leaving, thousands of Russians who had the economic means to do so were also fleeing, frightened by harsh new government moves connected to the war that they saw as a plunge into full totalitarianism. Some young men may have also fled in fear that the Kremlin would impose a mandatory draft to feed its war machine.

But fleeing had become much harder than it once was – the European Union’s 27 nations, along with the United States and Canada had banned flights to and from Russia. The Estonian capital of Tallinn, once an easy long-weekend destination 90 minutes by air from Moscow, suddenly took at least 12 hours to reach on a route through Istanbul.

Even vicarious travel via the Internet and social media has narrowed for Russians. Russia in March banned Facebook and Instagram – although that can be circumvented by using VPNs – and shut access to foreign media websites, including the BBC, the U.S. government-funded Voice of America and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and the German broadcaster Deutsche Welle.

After Russian authorities passed a law calling for up to 15 years’ imprisonment for stories that include “fake news” about the war, many significant independent news media shut down or suspended operations. Those included the Ekho Moskvy radio station and Novaya Gazeta, the newspaper whose editor Dmitry Muratov shared the most recent Nobel Peace Prize.

The psychological cost of the repressions, restrictions and shrinking opportunities could be high on ordinary Russians, although difficult to measure. Although some public opinion polls in Russia suggest support for the Ukraine war is strong, the results are likely skewed by respondents who stay silent, wary of expressing their genuine views.

Andrei Kolesnikov of the Carnegie Moscow Center wrote in a commentary that Russian society right now is gripped by an “aggressive submission” and that the degradation of social ties could accelerate.

“The discussion gets broader and broader. You can call your compatriot – a fellow citizen, but one who happens to have a different opinion – a “traitor” and consider them an inferior kind of person. You can, like the most senior state officials, speculate freely and quite calmly on the prospects of nuclear war. (That’s) something that was certainly never permitted in Soviet times during Pax Atomica, when the two sides understood that the ensuing damage was completely unthinkable,” he wrote.

“Now that understanding is waning, and that is yet another sign of the anthropological disaster Russia is facing,” he said.

The economic consequences have yet to fully play out.

In the early days of the war, the Russian ruble lost half its value. But government efforts to shore it up have actually raised its value to higher than its level before the invasion.

But in terms of economic activity, “that’s a completely different story,” said Chris Weafer, a veteran Russia economy analyst at Macro-Advisory.

“We see deterioration in the economy now across a broad range of sectors. Companies are warning that they’re running out of inventories of spare parts. A lot of companies put their workers on part time work and others are warning to them they have to shut down entirely. So there’s a real fear that unemployment will rise during the summer months, that there will be a big drop in consumption and retail sales and investment,” he told The Associated Press.

The comparatively strong ruble, however heartening it may seem, also poses problems for the national budget, Weafer said.

“They receive their revenue effectively in its foreign currency from the exporters and their payments are in rubles. So the stronger the ruble, then it means the less money that they actually have to spend,” he said. “(That) also makes Russian exporters less competitive, because they’re more expensive on the world stage.”

If the war drags on, more companies could exit Russia. Weafer suggested that those companies who have only suspended operations might resume them if a cease-fire and peace deal for Ukraine are reached, but he said the window for this could be closing.

“If you walk around shopping malls in Moscow, you can see that many of the fashion stores, Western business groups, have simply pulled down the shutters. Their shelves are still full, the lights are still on. They’re simply just not open. So they haven’t pulled out yet. They’re waiting to see what happens next,” he explained.

Those companies will soon be pressed to resolve the limbo that their Russian businesses are in, Weafer said.

“We are now getting to the stage where companies are starting to run out of time, or maybe run out of patience,” he said.

___

Follow all AP stories on the war in Ukraine at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine.

FILE – Few visitors walk inside the GUM department store in Moscow, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, March 4, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – In this image made from video released by the Russian Presidential Press Service, Russian President Vladimir Putin addresses the nation in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022. When Vladimir Putin announced Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the war seemed far away from Russian territory. Three months after the invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from blows to their livelihoods and emotions. (Russian Presidential Press Service via AP, File)


FILE – People walk past a McDonald’s restaurant in the main street in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, March 9, 2022. McDonald’s – whose opening in Russia in 1990 was a cultural phenomenon, a shiny modern convenience coming to a dreary country ground down by limited choices – pulled out of Russia entirely in response to its invasion of Ukraine. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – People walk past a currency exchange office screen displaying the exchange rates of U.S. Dollar and Euro to Russian Rubles in Moscow’s downtown, Russia, Feb. 28, 2022. Ordinary Russians are facing the prospect of higher prices as Western sanctions over the invasion of Ukraine sent the ruble plummeting. That’s led uneasy people to line up at banks and ATMs on Monday in a country that has seen more than one currency disaster in the post-Soviet era. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – A woman stands in a currency exchange office in St. Petersburg, Russia, Friday, Feb. 25, 2022. Russians flocked to banks and ATMs on Thursday and Friday shortly after Russia launched an attack on Ukraine and the West announced crippling sanctions. According to Russia’s Central Bank, on Thursday alone Russians have withdrawn 111 billion rubles (about $1.3 billion) in cash. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – Nobel Peace Prize winner Dmitry Muratov from Russia poses for a photo as he works on his speech at his room in The Grand Hotel in Oslo, Norway Thursday, Dec. 9, 2021. After Russian authorities passed a law calling for up to 15 years’ imprisonment for stories that include “fake news” about the war, many significant independent news media shut down or suspended operations. Those included the Ekho Moskvy radio station and Novaya Gazeta, the newspaper whose editor Dmitry Muratov shared the most recent Nobel Peace Prize. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)


FILE – Aeroflot’s passengers planes are parked at Sheremetyevo airport, outside Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, March 1, 2022. Fleeing had become much harder than it once was – the European Union’s 27 nations, along with the United States and Canada had banned flights to and from Russia. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – People stand in line to withdraw money from an ATM of Alfa Bank in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, Feb. 27, 2022. Russians flocked to banks and ATMs shortly after Russia launched an attack on Ukraine on Feb. 24 and the West announced crippling sanctions. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – A man holds a poster with writing reading “No war” as people lay flowers near the site where Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov was gunned down, with the Kremlin Wall, left, the Spaskaya Tower, center, and St. Basil’s in the background, in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, Feb. 27, 2022. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – People wait in a line to pay for her purchases at the IKEA store on the outskirts of Moscow, Russia, Thursday, March 3, 2022. IKEA, the epitome of affordable modern comforts, suspended operations. Tens of thousands of once-secure jobs are now suddenly in question in a very short time. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – Mannequins are seen through a window of closed Gucci boutique inside the GUM department store in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, March 9, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – An elderly couple walks in a main street in Moscow, Russia, Monday, March 14, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – A pedestrian walks along a closed Cartier boutique in the center of Moscow, Russia, Monday, March 14, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – Shipping containers from the Maersk company are seen among others at a transshipment terminal in St. Petersburg, Russia, Thursday, March 24, 2022. Danish shipping company Maersk has suspended bookings for shipping to and from Ukraine, Russia and Belarus until further notice. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – People walk past closed Adidas, Reebok and other shops in a mall in St. Petersburg, Russia, Thursday, March 24, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – A woman walks past a boutique in the GUM department store closed due to sanctions on Red Square in Moscow, Russia, Monday, March 28, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – People walk past a pharmacy and a currency exchange on a main street in Moscow, Russia, Friday, April 1, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File)


FILE – People walk past a currency exchange office screen displaying the exchange rates of U.S. Dollar and Euro to Russian Rubles in Moscow’s downtown, Russia, Tuesday, March 29, 2022. Three months after the Feb. 24 invasion, many ordinary Russians are reeling from those blows to their livelihoods and emotions. Moscow’s vast shopping malls have turned into eerie expanses of shuttered storefronts once occupied by Western retailers. (AP Photo, File)


FILE -Parishioners line up for Holy Communion after an Orthodox religion service celebrating the Palm Sunday in a church in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, April 17, 2022. The economic consequences have yet to fully play out. In the early days of the war, the Russian ruble lost half its value. But government efforts to shore it up have actually raised its value to higher than its level before the invasion. (AP Photo, File)

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When Vladimir Putin announced the invasion of Ukraine, war seemed far away from Russian territory. Yet within days the conflict came home – not with cruise missiles and mortars but in the form of unpr…