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WSJ on Twitter: Kat and Michael Burn “took a massive risk” constructing their Bend, Ore., with Cross-Laminated Timber, an uncommon technique in the U.S. which led to a number of delays and unexpected costs. They have no regrets. on.wsj.com/3NUgoyM

Kat and Michael Burn “took a massive risk” constructing their Bend, Ore., with Cross-Laminated Timber, an uncommon technique in the U.S. which led to a number of delays and unexpected costs. They have no regrets. on.wsj.com/3NUgoyM


10 likes, 3 retweets

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pitchfork on Twitter: “Some fans will tell me their whole life story, and I just be like, ‘Ma’am, I’m sorry, I cannot do this with you.’ I’m still unpacking my shit.”—@YayaBeyBay p4k.in/BRJp23G

“Some fans will tell me their whole life story, and I just be like, ‘Ma’am, I’m sorry, I cannot do this with you.’ I’m still unpacking my shit.”—@YayaBeyBay p4k.in/BRJp23G


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WSJ on Twitter: Atlantic City casino workers are voting Wednesday on whether to authorize a strike for increased wages, two weeks before the Fourth of July holiday weekend on.wsj.com/3NZ0wuV

Atlantic City casino workers are voting Wednesday on whether to authorize a strike for increased wages, two weeks before the Fourth of July holiday weekend on.wsj.com/3NZ0wuV


33 likes, 7 retweets

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ActionNetworkHQ on Twitter: 🚨 ANDRE BURAKOVSKY WINS IT IN OVERTIME Avalanche (-150 ML) ✅ pic.twitter.com/Ok8fqWu4h1

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22 likes, 6 retweets

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WSJ on Twitter: As offices have reopened, many who have pivoted back to so-called hard shoes have found that their feet no longer fit into their pre-pandemic footwear on.wsj.com/3xRKgGo

As offices have reopened, many who have pivoted back to so-called hard shoes have found that their feet no longer fit into their pre-pandemic footwear on.wsj.com/3xRKgGo


47 likes, 8 retweets

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Cartier on Twitter

Cartier on Twitter: @saemon822 この度はカルティエウォッチにご関心をお寄せ下さり誠にありがとうございます。 詳細につきましては、フリーダイヤル:0120-301-757、またはcontact.jp@cartier.comまでお問い合わせくださいますと幸いでございます。ご連絡を心よりお待ちいたしております。

@saemon822 この度はカルティエウォッチにご関心をお寄せ下さり誠にありがとうございます。
詳細につきましては、フリーダイヤル:0120-301-757、またはcontact.jp@cartier.comまでお問い合わせくださいますと幸いでございます。ご連絡を心よりお待ちいたしております。


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Wilk Realty on Twitter

wilkre on Twitter: 16699 Collins Ave #3106, Sunny Isles Beach, FL 33160 For Rent $6000 Beautiful ocean condo on the beach available immediately for rent for long term! Largest layout in the building! 2 + Den 2.5 baths!!! fully furnished!! Enjoy full service building… wilkrealestate.com/16699-collins-… pic.twitter.com/9UIAWMGsyW

16699 Collins Ave #3106, Sunny Isles Beach, FL 33160

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wilkrealestate.com/16699-collins-… pic.twitter.com/9UIAWMGsyW



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US, Germany sending weapons to Ukraine as Russia advances

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KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — The Russian military said it used long-range missiles Wednesday to destroy a depot in the western Lviv region of Ukraine where ammunition for NATO-supplied weapons was stored, and the governor of a key eastern city acknowledged that Russian forces are advancing in heavy fighting.

The battle for Sievierodonetsk in Ukraine’s eastern Donbas area has become the focus of Russia’s offensive in recent weeks.

Russia-backed separatists accused Ukrainian forces of sabotaging an evacuation of civilians from the city’s besieged Azot chemical plant, where about 500 civilians and an unknown number of Ukrainian fighters are believed to be sheltering from missile attacks. It wasn’t possible to verify that claim.

Russian officials had announced a humanitarian corridor from the Azot plant a day earlier, but said they would take civilians to areas controlled by Russian, not Ukrainian, forces.

The Ukrainian governor of Luhansk, Serhiy Haidai, told The Associated Press that “heavy fighting in Sievierodonetsk continues today as well.” The Luhansk and Donetsk regions make up the Donbas.

The situation in the city is getting worse, Haidai said, because Russian forces have more manpower and weapons. “But our military is holding back the enemy from three sides at once,” he added.

In the Lviv region near the border with NATO member Poland, Russian forces used high-precision Kalibr missiles to destroy the depot near the town of Zolochiv, Russian Defense Ministry spokesman Igor Konashenkov said. Konashenkov said shells for M777 howitzers, a type supplied by the United States, were stored there. He said four howitzers were destroyed elsewhere and that Russian airstrikes also destroyed Ukrainian “aviation equipment” at a military aerodrome in the southern Mykolaiv region.

Ukrainian officials did not immediately comment on the Zolochiv strike.

While focusing most of their attacks on eastern Ukraine, where they are trying to capture large swaths of territory, Russian forces have also been hitting more specific targets elsewhere, using high-precision missiles to disrupt the international supply of weapons and destroy military infrastructure. Civilian infrastructure has been bombarded as well, even though Russian officials have claimed they’re only targeting military facilities.

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NATO members are pledging to send more and longer-range weapons to Ukraine.

President Joe Biden said Wednesday the U.S. will send an additional $1 billion in military aid, the largest single tranche of weapons and equipment since the war began. The aid will include anti-ship missile launchers, howitzers and more rounds for the High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems — all key weapons systems that Ukrainian leaders have urgently requested.

Germany is providing Ukraine with three multiple launch rocket systems of the kind that Kyiv has said it urgently needs to defend itself against Russia’s invasion. Defense Minister Christine Lambrecht said Wednesday that Germany will transfer three M270 medium-range artillery rocket systems along with ammunition.

Germany said the transfer, which echoes similar moves by Britain and the United States, will be accompanied by training and will have “a swift and significant battlefield impact.”

In recent days, Ukrainian officials have spoken of the heavy human cost of the war, with Kyiv’s forces outgunned and outnumbered in the east.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy thanked Biden for the new aid package.

“The security support of the United States is unprecedented,” he said, reporting on a phone call the two leaders held earlier Wednesday. “It brings us closer to a common victory over the Russian aggressor.”

Zelenskyy said he has accepted invitations to speak at the NATO and Group of Seven summits at the end of the month.

“During the 112 days of this war, the Ukrainian army has proved that courage and wisdom on the battlefield, together with the ability to tactically outmaneuver the enemy, can have a significant result, even despite the Russian army’s significant advantage n number of soldiers and equipment,” he said in his nightly video address.

“Of course we are doing everything we can to overcome this advantage. Every day I fight for Ukraine to receive the weapons and equipment we need.”

Meanwhile, Dmitry Medvedev, the deputy chair of Russia’s Security Council, ominously suggested that Russia is intent on not just claiming territory but eliminating Ukraine as a nation. In a Telegram post, he wrote that he saw Ukraine wants to receive liquefied natural gas from its “overseas masters” with payment due in two years.

He added: “But there’s a question. Who said that in two years, Ukraine will even exist on the map?”

Mykhailo Podolyak, an adviser to Zelenskyy, responded on Twitter: “Ukraine has been and will be. Where will Medvedev be in two years? That’s the question.”

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MORE STORIES ON THE RUSSIA-UKRAINE WAR:

Mines are killing people in Ukraine even after the fighting leaves their areas

U.S. sending $1 billion more in military aid

— Two U.S. veterans reported missing in Ukraine

— Russia again cuts natural gas exports to Europe

Russia’s economic forum takes place but with fewer participants

__ French president suggests he will visit Kyiv to show support for Ukraine

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OTHER DEVELOPMENTS:

Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said it may be possible to create secure corridors to transport Ukrainian grain through the Black Sea without the need to clear sea mines near Ukrainian ports.

Cavusoglu’s comments Wednesday came a week after he discussed with his Russian counterpart Sergey Lavrov a U.N. plan to open up Odesa and Ukraine’s other Black Sea ports to allow millions of tons of grains to be shipped to world markets.

Russia has demanded that Ukraine remove mines from the Black Sea before grain exports can resume by ship. Ukraine rejects the proposal, insisting it would leave its ports vulnerable to Russian attacks.

Cavusoglu told reporters that since the location of the mines is known, it would be possible to establish “secure corridors” that avoid them. Turkey, Russia and Ukraine have appointed military officers and set up a telephone hotline to try to overcome hurdles over crop exports.

U.N. spokesperson Stéphane Dujarric welcomed Cavusoglu’s comments as “extremely positive” but declined to discuss the plan.

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A U.N. delegation investigating war crimes in Ukraine has visited areas of the country that were held by Russian troops and found evidence that could support war crimes allegations.

The delegation chaired by Erik Møse, a Norwegian judge, visited sites including the Kyiv suburbs of Bucha and Irpin, where Ukrainian authorities have accused Russia of mass killings of civilians.

“At this stage we are not in a position to make any factual findings or pronounce ourselves on issues of the legal determination of events,” Møse said.

“However, subject to further confirmation, the information received and the visited sites of destruction may support claims that serious violations of international human rights law and international humanitarian law, perhaps reaching war crimes and crimes against humanity, have been committed in the areas,” he said.

With Ukrainian and international organizations investigating war crimes cases, Møse expressed concern at the risk of investigations “overlapping” or causing witnesses more trauma by probing the same events repeatedly.

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Karmanau reported from Lviv.

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Follow the AP’s coverage of the war at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

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Spy agencies’ focus on China could snare Chinese Americans

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WASHINGTON (AP) — As U.S. intelligence agencies ramp up their efforts against China, top officials acknowledge they may also end up collecting more phone calls and emails from Chinese Americans, raising new concerns about spying affecting civil liberties.

A new report from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence makes several recommendations, including expanding unconscious bias training and reiterating internally that federal law bans targeting someone solely due to their ethnicity.

U.S. intelligence agencies are under constant pressure to better understand China’s decision-making on issues including nuclear weapons,geopolitics and the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic — and have responded with new centers and programs focusing on Beijing. While there’s bipartisan support for a tougher U.S. approach to China, civil rights groups and advocates are concerned about the disparate effect of enhanced surveillance on people of Chinese descent.

As one example, people who speak to relatives or contacts in China could be more likely to have their communications swept up, though intelligence agencies can’t quantify how often due in part to civil liberties concerns.

There’s a long history of U.S. government discrimination against groups of citizens in the name of national security. Japanese Americans were forced into internment camps during World War II, Black leaders were spied upon during the civil rights movement of the 1960s, and mosques were surveilled after the Sept. 11 attacks. Chinese Americans have faced discrimination going back to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the first law to explicitly ban immigration from a specific ethnic community.

Aryani Ong, co-founder of the advocacy group Asian American Federal Employees for Non-Discrimination, noted that people of Asian descent are sometimes “not fully trusted as loyal Americans.” She said the report, published May 31, would be useful to conversations about what she described as the conflation of civil rights and national defense.

Ong and other advocates pointed to the Justice Department’s “China Initiative,” created to target economic espionage and hacking operations by Beijing. The department dropped the name of the program after it had come to be associated with faltering prosecutions of Asian American professors at U.S. college campuses.

“Often we hear responses that we cannot weaken our national security, as if protecting constitutional rights of Asian Americans (is) contrary to our defense,” said Ong, who is Indonesian and Chinese American.

But in trying to produce demographic data on the impact of surveillance, the intelligence agencies say there’s a paradox: Examining the backgrounds of U.S. citizens whose data is collected requires more intrusion into those people’s lives.

“To try to find out that type of information would require additional collection that would absolutely not be authorized because it isn’t for the foreign intelligence purpose for which the intelligence community gets its authorities,” Ben Huebner, the chief civil liberties officer for Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines, said in an interview.

But, Huebner added, “I think the fact that we can’t analytically get to those types of metrics doesn’t mean that we get to sort of drop the ball on this.”

One potential disparity highlighted by the report is what’s known as “incidental collection.”

In surveilling a foreign target, intelligence agencies can obtain the target’s communications with a U.S. citizen who isn’t under investigation. The agencies also collect phone calls or emails of U.S. citizens as they sweep for foreign communications.

The National Security Agency has vast powers to surveil domestic and foreign communications, as revealed in part by documents leaked by Edward Snowden. Under NSA rules, two people have to sign off on putting any new foreign target under surveillance. The NSA masks the identities of U.S. citizens under federal law and intelligence guidelines and turns over potential domestic leads to the FBI.

The FBI can access some of the NSA’s collection without a warrant. Civil rights advocates have long argued that searches under what’s known as Section 702 disproportionately target minority communities.

The ODNI report notes that there “may be an increased risk of such incidental collection” for Chinese Americans as well as people not of Chinese ancestry who have business or personal ties to China. The report recommends a review of artificial intelligence programs to ensure they “avoid perpetuating historical biases and discrimination.” It also suggests agencies across the intelligence community expand unconscious bias training for people who handle information from incidental collection.

ODNI is also studying delays in granting security clearances and whether people of Chinese or Asian descent face longer or more invasive background investigations. While there is no publicly available data on clearances, some applicants from minority communities have questioned whether they undergo extra scrutiny due to their race or ethnicity. According to the report, U.S. intelligence assesses that “neither race nor ethnicity is the primary criterion utilized by the PRC’s intelligence services in their recruitment of intelligence assets.”

Sen. Mark Warner, a Virginia Democrat who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee, said in a statement that he welcomed the recommendations “to increase awareness of existing non-discrimination prohibitions and improve transparency around the security clearance process.”

But Sen. Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican who is the committee’s vice chairman, said requiring new training on unconscious bias and cultural competency was a distraction.

“The Chinese Communist Party likes nothing more than when we are distracted by divisive, internal politics,” Rubio said in a statement.

The ODNI report highlights FBI training on race and ethnicity as a “best practice” in the intelligence community. In a statement, the FBI said that there was “no place for bias and prejudice in our communities” and that law enforcement “must work to eliminate these flawed beliefs in our agencies to best serve those we are sworn to protect. The FBI said its agents are trained in “obedience to the Constitution” and in “treating everyone with dignity, empathy and respect.”

A senior NSA official, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive intelligence matters, said the agency currently requires unconscious bias training for managers and hiring officials, but not all employees. The NSA does train intelligence analysts on rules that prohibit the collection of intelligence for suppressing dissent or disadvantaging people based on their race, ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation, and is reviewing ODNI’s recommendations.

The CIA late last year issued new instructions to officers discouraging the use of the word “Chinese” to describe China’s government. The guidance suggests referring to the leadership as “China,” “the People’s Republic of China” or “PRC,” or “Beijing,” while using “Chinese” to refer to the people, language or culture.

“It’s important to be clear that our concern is about the threat posed by the People’s Republic of China, the PRC — not about the people of China, let alone fellow Americans of Chinese or Asian descent,” CIA Director William Burns said in a recent speech at the Georgia Institute of Technology. “It is a profound mistake to conflate the two.”

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Michael Novakhov retweeted: I deeply appreciate all of the efforts of my colleague and friend @SecDef Lloyd J. Austin III in organizing the 3rd Ukraine Defense Contact Group Meeting. Together we will destroy the aggressive plans of the terrorist state and restore peace to Europe. #Ramstein 3

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

I deeply appreciate all of the efforts of my colleague and friend @SecDef Lloyd J. Austin III in organizing the 3rd Ukraine Defense Contact Group Meeting. Together we will destroy the aggressive plans of the terrorist state and restore peace to Europe.

#Ramstein 3

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