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Despite Zelensky’s hope, no signs Ukraine war will end this year

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RUSSIAN PROGRESS SLOW: Ukraine continues to make effective use of U.S.-supplied HIMARS precision artillery rocket systems to degrade Russian forces, hitting and damaging a key bridge in the south that Russia needs to resupply its troops.

“It is one of only two road crossing points over the Dnieper by which Russia can supply or withdraw its forces in the territory it has occupied west of the river,” said the British Defense Ministry in its daily intelligence update.

“It is highly likely that the bridge remains usable, but it is a key vulnerability for Russian Forces,” the assessment said.

“We’re using HIMARS systems precisely like the scalpel of a doctor [in] surgery,” Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksii Reznikov said at an Atlantic Council event Tuesday. “We proved to our partners that we can use these economically, I would say, and precisely.”

Now that Ukraine has shown that it can effectively employ the high-tech systems, the race is on to train more crews and get more missiles into the fight. The next tranche of U.S. aid is expected to include more HIMARS systems. So far, the U.S. has supplied only 12.

Reznikov says Ukraine needs at least 50 HIMARS to hold off Russia and as many as 100 to take back lost territory.

UKRAINE SAYS IT NEEDS ‘AT LEAST 100’ MOBILE ROCKET SYSTEMS FOR COUNTERATTACK

CRIMEA REDUX: Despite the slow pace of Russia’s “meat-grinder” strategy, the U.S. believes Russian President Vladimir Putin plans to follow the same playbook he used to annex Crimea in 2014 to exert control over the areas that Russian forces currently occupy, including Kherson, Zaporizhia, the eastern Donbas region.

“We are seeing ample evidence Russia intends to annex additional Ukrainian territory,” said John Kirby, NSC coordinator for strategic communications, at a White House briefing yesterday. “Russia is beginning to roll out a version of what you could call an annexation playbook very similar to the one we saw in 2014.”

Among the tactics: installing Russian-backed officials in local governments, requiring the use of the Russian ruble for financial transitions, and forcing Ukrainians to apply for Russian passports.

“Putin’s timeline for annexation is likely contingent on the extent to which he understands the degraded state of the Russian military in Ukraine,” says the latest assessment from the Institute for the Study of War in Washington.

“He may intend to capture the remainder of Donetsk Oblast before annexing all occupied territories, which would likely force him to postpone annexation,” the ISW says. “Russia’s degraded forces are unlikely to occupy all of Donetsk Oblast before Russia’s September 11 unified voting day for local and gubernatorial elections.”

RUSSIA ‘LAYING THE GROUNDWORK TO ANNEX UKRAINIAN TERRITORY,’ WHITE HOUSE SAYS

Good Wednesday morning and welcome to Jamie McIntyre’s Daily on Defense, written and compiled by Washington Examiner National Security Senior Writer Jamie McIntyre (@jamiejmcintyre) and edited by Victor I. Nava. Email here with tips, suggestions, calendar items, and anything else. Sign up or read current and back issues at DailyonDefense.com. If signing up doesn’t work, shoot us an email and we’ll add you to our list. And be sure to follow us on Twitter: @dailyondefense.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP OR READ BACK ISSUES OF DAILY ON DEFENSE

Subscribe today to the Washington Examiner magazine and get Washington Briefing: politics and policy stories that will keep you up to date with what’s going on in Washington. SUBSCRIBE NOW: Just $1.00 an issue!

HAPPENING TODAY: We should get an idea of what the next shipment of weapons to Ukraine will include when Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin leads a virtual meeting of the Ukraine Defense Contact Group from the Pentagon this morning. The group, which includes more than 45 nations who have pledged to arm and assist Ukraine, last met at NATO headquarters last month.

Austin’s opening remarks will be livestreamed by the Pentagon at 8 a.m., and Austin and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley are scheduled to brief reporters afterward at approximately 12:30 p.m.

ALSO TODAY: At 11 a.m., Ukrainian first lady Olena Zelenska will address members of Congress inside the Capitol Visitor Center Congressional Auditorium.

“Olena will speak in the Congress on behalf of all Ukrainian mothers, all Ukrainian women, and it will be an important address,” said her husband Volodymyr Zelensky in his nightly video address. “And I really believe that it will be heard by those on whom decision-making in the U.S. depends.”

“The brutality of Russian aggression and the treatment of women and children have horrified the American people, and these crimes have been of particular concern to the women Members of Congress,” said House Speaker Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) in a letter to colleagues. “Indeed, we have sufficient evidence of kidnappings and deportations into Russia, rape of women in front of family members and even rape of little girls … I have been told these barbaric crimes are being directly ordered by Putin. Let me be clear: rape of children cannot be a weapon of war. It is a war crime!”

“We look forward to hearing First Lady Zelenska report on this situation, as well as offer insight on security, economic and humanitarian conditions on the ground,” Pelosi said.

PUTIN GETS IRANIAN ENDORSEMENT FOR WAR IN UKRAINE DURING TRIP TO MIDDLE EAST

PELOSI TO TAIWAN? A report yesterday in the Financial Times that Nancy Pelosi plans to lead a congressional delegation to Taiwan next month has prompted a furious backlash from China.

“China firmly opposes this as it will have a grave impact on the political foundation of bilateral relations,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said at a briefing in Beijing. “As an integral part of the U.S. government, the U.S. Congress should strictly abide by the one-China policy pursued by the US. If House Speaker Pelosi visits Taiwan, it will be a serious violation of the one-China principle and the provisions of the three China-US joint communiqués.”

“I think this is natural Chinese reaction, and if they can scare us off with rhetoric, they’ll do it,” said former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper on CNN. “I would vote for not being intimidated by standard Chinese rhetoric. I think the Chinese, frankly, are on their own timetable with respect to Taiwan. And I also think that what they have seen happen in Ukraine is going to give them pause.”

Pelosi had planned a trip to Taiwan in April but canceled it after contracting COVID. No speaker of the House has visited Taiwan since Newt Gingrich in 1997.

CHINESE MILITARY SET TO REPEAT SOME OF RUSSIA’S INVASION MISTAKES

TURNS OUT THE SECRET SERVICE DOESN’T HAVE JAN. 6 TEXTS AFTER ALL: After promising to deliver all relevant text data from Secret Service phones to the Jan. 6 committee by yesterday, the deadline came and went with only a single text exchange provided.

“We got one text message, and I haven’t seen it yet,” Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), a member of the Jan. 6 committee, said on MSNBC. “Obviously, this doesn’t look good. Coincidences can happen, but we really need to get to the bottom of this.”

Now, the National Archives is also demanding answers about why requirements to preserve government records were apparently not followed. In a letter to the Secret Service, the National Archives wants an explanation for “the potential unauthorized deletion” of agency text messages within 30 days.

“The United States Secret Service respects and supports the important role of the National Archives and Records Administration in ensuring preservation of government records. They will have our full cooperation in this review,” said Anthony Guglielmi, a Secret Service spokesman, in a tweet.

SECRET SERVICE HAS NO NEW TEXTS TO DELIVER TO JAN. 6 COMMITTEE: REPORT

INDUSTRY WATCH: The F-35 Joint Program Office and Lockheed Martin have reached a “handshake deal” on production of 375 aircraft in the next three lots, according to a report in Air Force Magazine.

The agreement comes after more than 10 months of negotiations, and it falls short of the original goal and timetable. “While the per-year production rate is unlikely to be the same across all three lots, at 375, production will average 125 aircraft a year. That’s well below the 156 per year that Lockheed Martin CEO James D Taiclet told stock analysts in a January conference call,” Air Force Magazine reports.

The news comes as the GAO has released a report citing a shortage of spare parts for F-35 engines that results in 9% of the fleet being unavailable, exceeding the DOD goal of 6%.

“The engine repair issue — and its ramifications for readiness — are a case study in why the Pentagon is struggling to reduce the estimated $1.3 trillion cost to operate and sustain the planes over a 66-year projected lifespan,” reported Bloomberg. “Engine sustainment costs are already projected to hit $1 billion annually by 2028, up from $315 million last year, as aircraft quantities, flying hours and scheduled maintenance increase,” Bloomberg said, citing the GAO.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

The Rundown

Washington Examiner: Russia ‘laying the groundwork to annex Ukrainian territory,’ White House says

Washington Examiner: Putin gets Iranian endorsement for war in Ukraine during trip to Middle East

Washington Examiner: Ukraine says it needs ‘at least 100’ mobile rocket systems for counterattack

Washington Examiner: New York Army National Guard heads to Germany to help train Ukrainians

Washington Examiner: Russia’s offensive struggles likely getting worse, UK says

Washington Examiner: Army personnel could be more than 25,000 short at end of fiscal year

Washington Examiner: Biden executive order allows agencies to sanction for wrongful detention abroad

Washington Examiner: Chinese military set to repeat some of Russia’s invasion mistakes

Washington Examiner: Opinion: White House defends spreading the US Navy thin when it can’t afford to

Washington Examiner: Opinion: From Merkel, with cold: Putin summons a winter freeze for Europe

CNN: U.S. Navy Destroyer Enters Chinese-Claimed Waters For Third Time In A Week

Stars and Stripes: China Announces Military Exercise Near Disputed Islands In South China Sea

Wall Street Journal: Kyiv Struggles With Western Arms

AP: ‘The mouth of a bear’: Ukrainian refugees sent to Russia

AP: Ukraine graft concerns resurface as Russia war goes on

Air Force Magazine: F-35 JPO and Lockheed Martin Reach Handshake Deal for 375 Aircraft

Bloomberg: Troubled Lockheed F-35 Risks More Groundings on Lack of Working Engines

Breaking Defense: New Air Force One Will Be 2-3 Years Late

Military Times: Funding Shortfalls Could Cause Major Readiness Problems, Leaders Warn

Air Force Magazine: At Readiness Hearing, Air Force Calls to Retire Old Aircraft, Space Force Asks for Advanced Training

USNI News: New Navy Fleet Study Calls for 373 Ship Battle Force, Details are Classified

Air Force Magazine: After Successful Flight Tests for Skyborg, XQ-58 ‘Continuing to Evolve’

Marine Corps Times: New Aerial Defense System Helps Marines Blast Simulated Cruise Missiles

Breaking Defense: Marines Ready To Buy Missile Intercept Capability That Uses Iron Dome Tech

The Hill: Pentagon Steps Into Senate Chip Debate, Citing National Security

Air Force Magazine: USAFE Won’t Add Extra F-35 Squadrons—But Will Get Rotation of F-22s, New Commander Says

Aviation Week: Air Force Aims to Increase Exports of Air-to-Air Missiles

19fortyfive.com: Coming Soon: A $1 Trillion U.S. Defense Budget?

19fortyfive.com: Joe Biden’s Magical Thinking on Iran

19fortyfive.com: Do We Really Need 6th-Generation Stealth Fighters?

19fortyfive.com: South Korea’s KF-21 Fighter Takes Flight: A Cheaper ‘F-35’ Alternative?

19fortyfive.com: Meet the M1A2 SEPv4: The U.S. Army’s New Tank That Could Surprise Everyone

19fortyfive.com: China’s 4th Aircraft Carrier: What the Experts Think About It

19fortyfive.com: Putin Has a Problem: HIMARS and Howitzers Are Stopping Russian Advances

Calendar

WEDNESDAY | JULY 20

7:15 a.m. 2425 Wilson Blvd, Arlington, Virginia — Association of the U.S. Army “Coffee Series” discussion with Army Undersecretary Gabe Camarillo https://www.ausa.org/events/ausa-coffee-series

9 a.m. 5000 Seminary Rd., Alexandria, Virginia — Institute for Defense and Government Advancement two-day VA Healthcare Conference, with Rep. Brad Wenstrup, R-Ohio; and Rep. Mike Levin, D-Calif., discussing “Saving Veterans’ Limbs and Lives by Application of the PAVE Program” https://www.idga.org/events-veteransaffairshealthcare

9 a.m. — Atlantic Council virtual discussion: “Biden’s Trip to the Middle East: Outcomes and Opportunities,” with former U.S. Ambassador to Israel Daniel Shapiro; Jonathan Panikoff, director of the Atlantic Council’s Middle East Security Initiative; and Kirsten Fontenrose, Atlantic Council nonresident senior fellow https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/event/outcomes-and-opportunities/

9 a.m. — Carnegie Endowment for International Peace virtual discussion: “Does the War in Ukraine Herald a New European Era?” with Benedetta Berti, foreign policy and security analyst; Marc Pierini, visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe; Sinan Ulgen, visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe; and Maha Yahya, director of the Carnegie Middle East Center https://carnegie-mec.org/2022/07/20

10:45 a.m. Aspen Meadows Resort, Colorado — Day two of the Aspen Security Forum with Gen. Charles Flynn, commanding Gen., U.S. Army Pacific; Gen. Laura Richardson, commander, U.S. Southern Command; Air Force Secretary Frank Kendall; Air Force Chief of Staff Charles Q. Brown; CIA Director William Burns; White House national security adviser, Jake Sullivan; U.S. Northern Commander Gen. Glen VanHerck; former Defense Secretary Robert Gates; former Defense Secretary Mark Esper; Army Gen. Richard Clarke, commander U.S. Special Operations Command; Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va.; former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice; Kay Bailey Hutchison, former U.S. ambassador to NATO; and others. Full agenda at https://www.aspensecurityforum.org

2 p.m. 1616 Rhode Island Ave. N.W. — Center for Strategic and International Studies discussion: “Now the Real Work Begins: The U.S.-Japan Alliance Agenda,” with Edgard Kagan, special assistant to the president and senior director for East Asia and Oceania at the National Security Council; and Pamela Phan, deputy assistant secretary for Asia at the Commerce Department’s International Trade Administration https://www.csis.org/events/now-real-work-begins

THURSDAY | JULY 21

8:30 a.m. — Jewish Institute for National Security of America virtual discussion: “Advancing Abraham Accords Through Regional Air Defense,” with Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa; and Michael Makovsky, president and CEO of JINSA https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register

9 a.m. — Arab Center virtual discussion: “Iran and the Regional Order,” with Mahsa Rouhi, research fellow at the National Defense University’s Center for Strategic Research https://dohainstitute-org.zoom.us/webinar/register

9:30 a.m. G50 Dirksen — Senate Armed Services Committee confirmation hearing for Lt. Gen. Bryan Fenton for promotion to general and to be commander, U.S. Special Operations Command; and Lt. Gen. Michael Langley for promotion to general and to be commander, U.S. Africa Command https://www.armed-services.senate.gov/hearings

3 p.m. — Atlantic Council virtual discussion:”Sweden and Finland’s application to join NATO and the future of security in Europe,” with Finnish Ambassador to the U.S. Mikko Hautala; and Swedish Ambassador to the U.S. Karin Olofsdotter https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/event/ambassadors

WEDNESDAY | JULY 27

TBA Fort Bragg, North Carolina — Association of the U.S. Army two-day, in-person “Warfighter Summit and Exposition,” with Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville; Sgt. Maj. of the Army Michael Grinston; Alejandro Villanueva, former Army Ranger and former offensive tackle for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore Ravens; as well as leaders from Army Forces Command, the XVIII Airborne Corps and the 82nd Airborne Division. Register at https://meetings.ausa.org/warfighter/index.cfm

9 a.m. 10 Daniel French Dr., S.W. — Korean War Veterans Memorial “Wall of Remembrance Dedication Ceremony,” in which an addition featuring names of more than 36,000 American war dead and 7,000 Koreans who fought alongside them will be unveiled, with President Joe Biden and South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol attending. https://koreanwarvetsmemorial.org/event/wall-of-remembrance-dedication/

THURSDAY | JULY 28

1:30 p.m. — Center for a New American Security virtual fireside chat with Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr.; and Stacie Pettyjohn, senior fellow, director, CNAS Defense Program. https://www.cnas.org/events/virtual-fireside-chat

“We are seeing ample evidence Russia intends to annex additional Ukrainian territory. Russia is beginning to roll out a version of what you could call an annexation playbook very similar to the one we saw in 2014.”

John Kirby, National Security Council coordinator for strategic communications, at a White House briefing Tuesday.

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RUSSIAN PROGRESS SLOW: Ukraine continues to make effective use of U.S.-supplied HIMARS precision artillery rocket systems to degrade Russian forces, hitting and damaging a key bridge in the south that Russia needs to resupply its troops.

“It is one of only two road crossing points over the Dnieper by which Russia can supply or withdraw its forces in the territory it has occupied west of the river,” said the British Defense Ministry in its daily intelligence update.

“It is highly likely that the bridge remains usable, but it is a key vulnerability for Russian Forces,” the assessment said.

“We’re using HIMARS systems precisely like the scalpel of a doctor [in] surgery,” Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksii Reznikov said at an Atlantic Council event Tuesday. “We proved to our partners that we can use these economically, I would say, and precisely.”

Now that Ukraine has shown that it can effectively employ the high-tech systems, the race is on to train more crews and get more missiles into the fight. The next tranche of U.S. aid is expected to include more HIMARS systems. So far, the U.S. has supplied only 12.

Reznikov says Ukraine needs at least 50 HIMARS to hold off Russia and as many as 100 to take back lost territory.

UKRAINE SAYS IT NEEDS ‘AT LEAST 100’ MOBILE ROCKET SYSTEMS FOR COUNTERATTACK

CRIMEA REDUX: Despite the slow pace of Russia’s “meat-grinder” strategy, the U.S. believes Russian President Vladimir Putin plans to follow the same playbook he used to annex Crimea in 2014 to exert control over the areas that Russian forces currently occupy, including Kherson, Zaporizhia, the eastern Donbas region.

“We are seeing ample evidence Russia intends to annex additional Ukrainian territory,” said John Kirby, NSC coordinator for strategic communications, at a White House briefing yesterday. “Russia is beginning to roll out a version of what you could call an annexation playbook very similar to the one we saw in 2014.”

Among the tactics: installing Russian-backed officials in local governments, requiring the use of the Russian ruble for financial transitions, and forcing Ukrainians to apply for Russian passports.

“Putin’s timeline for annexation is likely contingent on the extent to which he understands the degraded state of the Russian military in Ukraine,” says the latest assessment from the Institute for the Study of War in Washington.

“He may intend to capture the remainder of Donetsk Oblast before annexing all occupied territories, which would likely force him to postpone annexation,” the ISW says. “Russia’s degraded forces are unlikely to occupy all of Donetsk Oblast before Russia’s September 11 unified voting day for local and gubernatorial elections.”

RUSSIA ‘LAYING THE GROUNDWORK TO ANNEX UKRAINIAN TERRITORY,’ WHITE HOUSE SAYS

Good Wednesday morning and welcome to Jamie McIntyre’s Daily on Defense, written and compiled by Washington Examiner National Security Senior Writer Jamie McIntyre (@jamiejmcintyre) and edited by Victor I. Nava. Email here with tips, suggestions, calendar items, and anything else. Sign up or read current and back issues at DailyonDefense.com. If signing up doesn’t work, shoot us an email and we’ll add you to our list. And be sure to follow us on Twitter: @dailyondefense.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP OR READ BACK ISSUES OF DAILY ON DEFENSE

Subscribe today to the Washington Examiner magazine and get Washington Briefing: politics and policy stories that will keep you up to date with what’s going on in Washington. SUBSCRIBE NOW: Just $1.00 an issue!

HAPPENING TODAY: We should get an idea of what the next shipment of weapons to Ukraine will include when Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin leads a virtual meeting of the Ukraine Defense Contact Group from the Pentagon this morning. The group, which includes more than 45 nations who have pledged to arm and assist Ukraine, last met at NATO headquarters last month.

Austin’s opening remarks will be livestreamed by the Pentagon at 8 a.m., and Austin and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley are scheduled to brief reporters afterward at approximately 12:30 p.m.

ALSO TODAY: At 11 a.m., Ukrainian first lady Olena Zelenska will address members of Congress inside the Capitol Visitor Center Congressional Auditorium.

“Olena will speak in the Congress on behalf of all Ukrainian mothers, all Ukrainian women, and it will be an important address,” said her husband Volodymyr Zelensky in his nightly video address. “And I really believe that it will be heard by those on whom decision-making in the U.S. depends.”

“The brutality of Russian aggression and the treatment of women and children have horrified the American people, and these crimes have been of particular concern to the women Members of Congress,” said House Speaker Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) in a letter to colleagues. “Indeed, we have sufficient evidence of kidnappings and deportations into Russia, rape of women in front of family members and even rape of little girls … I have been told these barbaric crimes are being directly ordered by Putin. Let me be clear: rape of children cannot be a weapon of war. It is a war crime!”

“We look forward to hearing First Lady Zelenska report on this situation, as well as offer insight on security, economic and humanitarian conditions on the ground,” Pelosi said.

PUTIN GETS IRANIAN ENDORSEMENT FOR WAR IN UKRAINE DURING TRIP TO MIDDLE EAST

PELOSI TO TAIWAN? A report yesterday in the Financial Times that Nancy Pelosi plans to lead a congressional delegation to Taiwan next month has prompted a furious backlash from China.

“China firmly opposes this as it will have a grave impact on the political foundation of bilateral relations,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said at a briefing in Beijing. “As an integral part of the U.S. government, the U.S. Congress should strictly abide by the one-China policy pursued by the US. If House Speaker Pelosi visits Taiwan, it will be a serious violation of the one-China principle and the provisions of the three China-US joint communiqués.”

“I think this is natural Chinese reaction, and if they can scare us off with rhetoric, they’ll do it,” said former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper on CNN. “I would vote for not being intimidated by standard Chinese rhetoric. I think the Chinese, frankly, are on their own timetable with respect to Taiwan. And I also think that what they have seen happen in Ukraine is going to give them pause.”

Pelosi had planned a trip to Taiwan in April but canceled it after contracting COVID. No speaker of the House has visited Taiwan since Newt Gingrich in 1997.

CHINESE MILITARY SET TO REPEAT SOME OF RUSSIA’S INVASION MISTAKES

TURNS OUT THE SECRET SERVICE DOESN’T HAVE JAN. 6 TEXTS AFTER ALL: After promising to deliver all relevant text data from Secret Service phones to the Jan. 6 committee by yesterday, the deadline came and went with only a single text exchange provided.

“We got one text message, and I haven’t seen it yet,” Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), a member of the Jan. 6 committee, said on MSNBC. “Obviously, this doesn’t look good. Coincidences can happen, but we really need to get to the bottom of this.”

Now, the National Archives is also demanding answers about why requirements to preserve government records were apparently not followed. In a letter to the Secret Service, the National Archives wants an explanation for “the potential unauthorized deletion” of agency text messages within 30 days.

“The United States Secret Service respects and supports the important role of the National Archives and Records Administration in ensuring preservation of government records. They will have our full cooperation in this review,” said Anthony Guglielmi, a Secret Service spokesman, in a tweet.

SECRET SERVICE HAS NO NEW TEXTS TO DELIVER TO JAN. 6 COMMITTEE: REPORT

INDUSTRY WATCH: The F-35 Joint Program Office and Lockheed Martin have reached a “handshake deal” on production of 375 aircraft in the next three lots, according to a report in Air Force Magazine.

The agreement comes after more than 10 months of negotiations, and it falls short of the original goal and timetable. “While the per-year production rate is unlikely to be the same across all three lots, at 375, production will average 125 aircraft a year. That’s well below the 156 per year that Lockheed Martin CEO James D Taiclet told stock analysts in a January conference call,” Air Force Magazine reports.

The news comes as the GAO has released a report citing a shortage of spare parts for F-35 engines that results in 9% of the fleet being unavailable, exceeding the DOD goal of 6%.

“The engine repair issue — and its ramifications for readiness — are a case study in why the Pentagon is struggling to reduce the estimated $1.3 trillion cost to operate and sustain the planes over a 66-year projected lifespan,” reported Bloomberg. “Engine sustainment costs are already projected to hit $1 billion annually by 2028, up from $315 million last year, as aircraft quantities, flying hours and scheduled maintenance increase,” Bloomberg said, citing the GAO.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

The Rundown

Washington Examiner: Russia ‘laying the groundwork to annex Ukrainian territory,’ White House says

Washington Examiner: Putin gets Iranian endorsement for war in Ukraine during trip to Middle East

Washington Examiner: Ukraine says it needs ‘at least 100’ mobile rocket systems for counterattack

Washington Examiner: New York Army National Guard heads to Germany to help train Ukrainians

Washington Examiner: Russia’s offensive struggles likely getting worse, UK says

Washington Examiner: Army personnel could be more than 25,000 short at end of fiscal year

Washington Examiner: Biden executive order allows agencies to sanction for wrongful detention abroad

Washington Examiner: Chinese military set to repeat some of Russia’s invasion mistakes

Washington Examiner: Opinion: White House defends spreading the US Navy thin when it can’t afford to

Washington Examiner: Opinion: From Merkel, with cold: Putin summons a winter freeze for Europe

CNN: U.S. Navy Destroyer Enters Chinese-Claimed Waters For Third Time In A Week

Stars and Stripes: China Announces Military Exercise Near Disputed Islands In South China Sea

Wall Street Journal: Kyiv Struggles With Western Arms

AP: ‘The mouth of a bear’: Ukrainian refugees sent to Russia

AP: Ukraine graft concerns resurface as Russia war goes on

Air Force Magazine: F-35 JPO and Lockheed Martin Reach Handshake Deal for 375 Aircraft

Bloomberg: Troubled Lockheed F-35 Risks More Groundings on Lack of Working Engines

Breaking Defense: New Air Force One Will Be 2-3 Years Late

Military Times: Funding Shortfalls Could Cause Major Readiness Problems, Leaders Warn

Air Force Magazine: At Readiness Hearing, Air Force Calls to Retire Old Aircraft, Space Force Asks for Advanced Training

USNI News: New Navy Fleet Study Calls for 373 Ship Battle Force, Details are Classified

Air Force Magazine: After Successful Flight Tests for Skyborg, XQ-58 ‘Continuing to Evolve’

Marine Corps Times: New Aerial Defense System Helps Marines Blast Simulated Cruise Missiles

Breaking Defense: Marines Ready To Buy Missile Intercept Capability That Uses Iron Dome Tech

The Hill: Pentagon Steps Into Senate Chip Debate, Citing National Security

Air Force Magazine: USAFE Won’t Add Extra F-35 Squadrons—But Will Get Rotation of F-22s, New Commander Says

Aviation Week: Air Force Aims to Increase Exports of Air-to-Air Missiles

19fortyfive.com: Coming Soon: A $1 Trillion U.S. Defense Budget?

19fortyfive.com: Joe Biden’s Magical Thinking on Iran

19fortyfive.com: Do We Really Need 6th-Generation Stealth Fighters?

19fortyfive.com: South Korea’s KF-21 Fighter Takes Flight: A Cheaper ‘F-35’ Alternative?

19fortyfive.com: Meet the M1A2 SEPv4: The U.S. Army’s New Tank That Could Surprise Everyone

19fortyfive.com: China’s 4th Aircraft Carrier: What the Experts Think About It

19fortyfive.com: Putin Has a Problem: HIMARS and Howitzers Are Stopping Russian Advances

Calendar

WEDNESDAY | JULY 20

7:15 a.m. 2425 Wilson Blvd, Arlington, Virginia — Association of the U.S. Army “Coffee Series” discussion with Army Undersecretary Gabe Camarillo https://www.ausa.org/events/ausa-coffee-series

9 a.m. 5000 Seminary Rd., Alexandria, Virginia — Institute for Defense and Government Advancement two-day VA Healthcare Conference, with Rep. Brad Wenstrup, R-Ohio; and Rep. Mike Levin, D-Calif., discussing “Saving Veterans’ Limbs and Lives by Application of the PAVE Program” https://www.idga.org/events-veteransaffairshealthcare

9 a.m. — Atlantic Council virtual discussion: “Biden’s Trip to the Middle East: Outcomes and Opportunities,” with former U.S. Ambassador to Israel Daniel Shapiro; Jonathan Panikoff, director of the Atlantic Council’s Middle East Security Initiative; and Kirsten Fontenrose, Atlantic Council nonresident senior fellow https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/event/outcomes-and-opportunities/

9 a.m. — Carnegie Endowment for International Peace virtual discussion: “Does the War in Ukraine Herald a New European Era?” with Benedetta Berti, foreign policy and security analyst; Marc Pierini, visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe; Sinan Ulgen, visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe; and Maha Yahya, director of the Carnegie Middle East Center https://carnegie-mec.org/2022/07/20

10:45 a.m. Aspen Meadows Resort, Colorado — Day two of the Aspen Security Forum with Gen. Charles Flynn, commanding Gen., U.S. Army Pacific; Gen. Laura Richardson, commander, U.S. Southern Command; Air Force Secretary Frank Kendall; Air Force Chief of Staff Charles Q. Brown; CIA Director William Burns; White House national security adviser, Jake Sullivan; U.S. Northern Commander Gen. Glen VanHerck; former Defense Secretary Robert Gates; former Defense Secretary Mark Esper; Army Gen. Richard Clarke, commander U.S. Special Operations Command; Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va.; former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice; Kay Bailey Hutchison, former U.S. ambassador to NATO; and others. Full agenda at https://www.aspensecurityforum.org

2 p.m. 1616 Rhode Island Ave. N.W. — Center for Strategic and International Studies discussion: “Now the Real Work Begins: The U.S.-Japan Alliance Agenda,” with Edgard Kagan, special assistant to the president and senior director for East Asia and Oceania at the National Security Council; and Pamela Phan, deputy assistant secretary for Asia at the Commerce Department’s International Trade Administration https://www.csis.org/events/now-real-work-begins

THURSDAY | JULY 21

8:30 a.m. — Jewish Institute for National Security of America virtual discussion: “Advancing Abraham Accords Through Regional Air Defense,” with Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa; and Michael Makovsky, president and CEO of JINSA https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register

9 a.m. — Arab Center virtual discussion: “Iran and the Regional Order,” with Mahsa Rouhi, research fellow at the National Defense University’s Center for Strategic Research https://dohainstitute-org.zoom.us/webinar/register

9:30 a.m. G50 Dirksen — Senate Armed Services Committee confirmation hearing for Lt. Gen. Bryan Fenton for promotion to general and to be commander, U.S. Special Operations Command; and Lt. Gen. Michael Langley for promotion to general and to be commander, U.S. Africa Command https://www.armed-services.senate.gov/hearings

3 p.m. — Atlantic Council virtual discussion:”Sweden and Finland’s application to join NATO and the future of security in Europe,” with Finnish Ambassador to the U.S. Mikko Hautala; and Swedish Ambassador to the U.S. Karin Olofsdotter https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/event/ambassadors

WEDNESDAY | JULY 27

TBA Fort Bragg, North Carolina — Association of the U.S. Army two-day, in-person “Warfighter Summit and Exposition,” with Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville; Sgt. Maj. of the Army Michael Grinston; Alejandro Villanueva, former Army Ranger and former offensive tackle for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore Ravens; as well as leaders from Army Forces Command, the XVIII Airborne Corps and the 82nd Airborne Division. Register at https://meetings.ausa.org/warfighter/index.cfm

9 a.m. 10 Daniel French Dr., S.W. — Korean War Veterans Memorial “Wall of Remembrance Dedication Ceremony,” in which an addition featuring names of more than 36,000 American war dead and 7,000 Koreans who fought alongside them will be unveiled, with President Joe Biden and South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol attending. https://koreanwarvetsmemorial.org/event/wall-of-remembrance-dedication/

THURSDAY | JULY 28

1:30 p.m. — Center for a New American Security virtual fireside chat with Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr.; and Stacie Pettyjohn, senior fellow, director, CNAS Defense Program. https://www.cnas.org/events/virtual-fireside-chat

“We are seeing ample evidence Russia intends to annex additional Ukrainian territory. Russia is beginning to roll out a version of what you could call an annexation playbook very similar to the one we saw in 2014.”

John Kirby, National Security Council coordinator for strategic communications, at a White House briefing Tuesday.